Nigeria scams via dating websites

"In the process of going back and forth, a scammer is going to try to figure out what makes a person tick, what their vulnerable spots are," said Jenny Shearer, an FBI spokeswoman.

"Because a victim has legitimate feelings, they might be inclined to offer financial support for this person." For Best, it all started when she signed up for a free online dating site called mingle2.

Victims think they’re just helping out their soulmate, never realizing they’re aiding and abetting a crime.

Here’s the real deal: Don’t send money to someone you met online — for any reason.A man calling himself "John" messaged her and through daily phone calls and messages on Facebook, he gained her trust.He spoke with what she thought was a British accent and his picture on Facebook portrayed a nice-looking man with graying hair and a beard.They ask you to: Did you know you can do an image search of your love interest’s photo in your favorite search engine?If you do an image search and the person’s photo appears under several different names, you’re probably dealing with a scammer.

Leave a Reply